The Staxx
From very early on, when I looked at art, I liked having my socks knocked off.  I like being overwhelmed and finding myself slightly giddy.  Both abstract and realistic paintings were able to deliver the sensation - Rothko’s and Rembrandt’s could both do it.  It was the effect and the content of the art that ultimately counted, not its form.  Kant’s take on the Sublime is terrific.  He describes it as an overwhelming experience beyond comprehension, a point where the imagination reaches its limits and succumbs to “emotional delight.”  
James Ward usually made little genre paintings of pigs and horses and goats, which you wouldn’t think would qualify him for entry into the category of painters of the Sublime.  Most of his paintings are mundane, not very interesting at all.  But for some unknowable reason, at one point in his life, he uncorked this huge 11-by-14 foot painting of Gordale Scar, England’s version of the Grand Canyon.  The painting is a view of this enormous cliff, and there are tiny little cows at the bottom of it.  I remember coming up to the picture for the first time and going, “Wow!”  I immediately thought of Clyfford Still, the Abstract Expressionist.  I understood that Ward’s and Still’s paintings weren’t about abstraction of realism, they were about the Sublime.  Different vocabularies led to similar content.  And it was the content that was the turn on.  There it was.  I realized that their art wasn’t about abstraction or realism, it was about the Sublime.   — C. Ross

From very early on, when I looked at art, I liked having my socks knocked off.  I like being overwhelmed and finding myself slightly giddy.  Both abstract and realistic paintings were able to deliver the sensation - Rothko’s and Rembrandt’s could both do it.  It was the effect and the content of the art that ultimately counted, not its form.  Kant’s take on the Sublime is terrific.  He describes it as an overwhelming experience beyond comprehension, a point where the imagination reaches its limits and succumbs to “emotional delight.”  

James Ward usually made little genre paintings of pigs and horses and goats, which you wouldn’t think would qualify him for entry into the category of painters of the Sublime.  Most of his paintings are mundane, not very interesting at all.  But for some unknowable reason, at one point in his life, he uncorked this huge 11-by-14 foot painting of Gordale Scar, England’s version of the Grand Canyon.  The painting is a view of this enormous cliff, and there are tiny little cows at the bottom of it.  I remember coming up to the picture for the first time and going, “Wow!”  I immediately thought of Clyfford Still, the Abstract Expressionist.  I understood that Ward’s and Still’s paintings weren’t about abstraction of realism, they were about the Sublime.  Different vocabularies led to similar content.  And it was the content that was the turn on.  There it was.  I realized that their art wasn’t about abstraction or realism, it was about the Sublime.   — C. Ross